Marc Jacobs and Faux Locs

News Journal: Week 4 – 9.19.16

Marc Jacobs’s Use of Faux Locs on Models Draws Social Media Ire

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By VALERIYA SAFRONOVA SEPT. 16, 2016 New York Times

Marc Jacobs recently went under a lot of fire for his recent runway show that featured models with faux locs. The designer’s bold choice sparked the fire in the argument of cultural appropriation. While the show started the conversation, it was Marc Jacobs response to the comments on his show that created the flames. Valeriya Safronova writes from an unbiased perspective and just includes the facts. She did a great job of including not only the incident with Marc Jacob but as well as other instances that have occurred in the fashion world dealing with culture appropriation. This article is primarily quoted from designers and twitter users allowing for each side to have an argument. I believe that this article was well written and succeeded at informing the reader. One thing that made the article a little less credible is the fact that it has not been updated since it’s original posting date. Marc Jacobs came back on to social media about a day later to correct his statement and apologize for what he said after reading the comments.

PRESIDENTIAL POLITICS PLAYS BIG ROLE AT EMMY AWARDS

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BY DAVID BAUDER Sep 18, 2016 AP News

David Bauder zeros in a trend taking place at the Emmy Awards with the constant jokes by celebrities on this year’s presidential election. Bauder pulls quotes not only from the show itself but from Twitter as well. Bauder keeps the sentence length shorts allowing for quick little laughs from the reader. This article grabs the attention of the reader with its title and keeps the reader’s attention with its use of the most humorous moments of the event. This article was entertaining but felt unfinished. The reader clearly can see how politics played a role at the Emmy Awards but adding a sentence or two to tie everything up would have helped to make the article feel finished.

Chelsea Bombing: What We Know and Don’t Know

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By KAREN WORKMAN, ELI ROSENBERG and CHRISTOPHER MELE SEPT. 18, 2016 NYTimes

This article gives an update on what was happening with the Chelsea Bombing. The writers wrote in short sentences with not a lot of variation that helped to keep the article short, quick and just the facts. The article is very straight forwarded and answers a lot of the questions the general public would have and organizes the article in that way. One of the things that made the article weak is the section talking about Ahmad Khan Rahami. In this section, there isn’t very much information that serves a purpose to the reader. If I were writing this article I would have cut the lines stating, “he was known for an obsession with souped-up Honda Civics that he liked to race” and “He lives above the fried chicken restaurant . . .” To me, the first statement does not serve a relevance to the issue at hand and reasoning for him to do the bombing. The second statement was poorly written and could have been more specific if the writers wanted to keep more detail out in efforts to protect the rest of his family then the sentence can be removed altogether. Overall the article informed the reader of what is happening with the Chelsea Bombing but too much information that clearly does not belong can start to ruin the credibility of the article.

(Photo via Credit Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images for Marc Jacobs)

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